OSTEOPOROSIS
PROVIDING QUALITY HEALTH CARE THROUGH TEAM WORK
(203)281-5910
We appreciate the opportunity to provide you with health care. Our office staff works together as a team to bring you the highest quality of health care in a warm and caring atmosphere. This website is designed to answer questions most frequently asked. However, if your answers are not found on this website, please feel free to contact our office at  (203)281-5910 and speak with any staff member. We have three different locations (Hamden, Branford, and Milford) providing same high quality health care.
Welcome
Osteoporosis is a disease of the bones, which occurs slowly over time, without symptoms, until a bone breaks. It is called the silent disease because you cannot feel your bones becoming weak. Ten million Americans already have osteoporosis and 18 million have low bone mineral density placing them at risk for the disease. The consequences are devastating. Early diagnosis is important so that treatment or medication can be started. The amount of bone mineral relates directly to bone strength, regardless of age. A Bone Mineral Density (BMD) Test measures the amount of minerals in the bone. A certified Bone Densitometrist does the test on a bone densitometer using small amounts of X-ray. It is available upon referral from your physician, and performed on our state-of-the-art equipment, in a comfortable and friendly office environment. The test is quick, approximately 10 minutes, and painless and only requires that you remove your shoes.
Osteoarthritis (also known as OA) is a common joint disease that most often affects middle-age to elderly people. It is commonly referred to as "wear and tear" of the joints, but we now know that OA is a disease of the entire joint, involving the cartilage, joint lining, ligaments, and bone.  Although it is more common in older people, it is not really accurate to say that the joints are just “wearing out.” It is characterized by breakdown of the cartilage (the tissue that cushions the ends of the bones between joints), bony changes of the joints, deterioration of tendons and ligaments, and various degrees of inflammation of the joint lining (called the synovium). This arthritis tends to occur in the hand joints, spine, hips, knees, and great toes. The lifetime risk of developing OA of the knee is about 46 percent, and the lifetime risk of developing OA of the hip is 25 percent, according to the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, a long-term study from the University of North Carolina and sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (often called the CDC) and the National Institutes of Health. OA is a top cause of disability in older people. The goal of osteoarthritis treatment is to reduce pain and improve function. There is no cure for the disease, but some treatments attempt to slow disease progression.
RA is the most common form of autoimmune arthritis, affecting more than 1.3 million Americans. Of these, about 75 percent are women. In fact, 1–3 percent of women may get rheumatoid arthritis in their lifetime. The disease most often begins between the fourth and sixth decades of life. However, RA can start at any age. RA is a chronic (long-term) disease that causes pain, stiffness, swelling and limited motion and function of many joints. While RA can affect any joint, the small joints in the hands and feet tend to be involved most often. Inflammation sometimes can affect organs as well, for instance, the eyes or lungs. The stiffness seen in active RA is most often worst in the morning. It may last one to two hours (or even the whole day). Stiffness for a long time in the morning is a clue that you may have RA, since few other arthritic diseases behave this way.
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OSTEOARTHRITIS
RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS
Lupus is a chronic, autoimmune disease that can damage any part of the body (skin, joints, and/or organs inside the body). Chronic means that the signs and symptoms tend to last longer than six weeks and often for many years. In lupus, something goes wrong with your immune system, which is the part of the body that fights off viruses, bacteria, and germs ("foreign invaders," like the flu). Normally our immune system produces proteins called antibodies that protect the body from these invaders. Autoimmune means your immune system cannot tell the difference between these foreign invaders and your body’s healthy tissues ("auto" means "self") and creates autoantibodies that attack and destroy healthy tissue. These autoantibodies cause inflammation, pain, and damage in various parts of the body.
LUPUS
OSTEOPOROSIS
PROVIDING QUALITY HEALTH CARE THROUGH TEAM WORK
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We appreciate the opportunity to provide you with health care. Our office staff works together as a team to bring you the highest quality of health care in a warm and caring atmosphere. This website is designed to answer questions most frequently asked. However, if your answers are not found on this website, please feel free to contact our office at  (203)281-5910 and speak with any staff member. We have three different locations (Hamden, Branford, and Milford) providing same high quality health care.
Welcome
Osteoporosis is a disease of the bones, which occurs slowly over time, without symptoms, until a bone breaks. It is called the silent disease because you cannot feel your bones becoming weak. Ten million Americans already have osteoporosis and 18 million have low bone mineral density placing them at risk for the disease. The consequences are devastating. Early diagnosis is important so that treatment or medication can be started. The amount of bone mineral relates directly to bone strength, regardless of age. A Bone Mineral Density (BMD) Test measures the amount of minerals in the bone. A certified Bone Densitometrist does the test on a bone densitometer using small amounts of X-ray. It is available upon referral from your physician, and performed on our state-of-the-art equipment, in a comfortable and friendly office environment. The test is quick, approximately 10 minutes, and painless and only requires that you remove your shoes.
OSTEOARTHRITIS
Osteoarthritis (also known as OA) is a common joint disease that most often affects middle-age to elderly people. It is commonly referred to as "wear and tear" of the joints, but we now know that OA is a disease of the entire joint, involving the cartilage, joint lining, ligaments, and bone.  Although it is more common in older people, it is not really accurate to say that the joints are just “wearing out.” It is characterized by breakdown of the cartilage (the tissue that cushions the ends of the bones between joints), bony changes of the joints, deterioration of tendons and ligaments, and various degrees of inflammation of the joint lining (called the synovium). This arthritis tends to occur in the hand joints, spine, hips, knees, and great toes. The lifetime risk of developing OA of the knee is about 46 percent, and the lifetime risk of developing OA of the hip is 25 percent, according to the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, a long-term study from the University of North Carolina and sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (often called the CDC) and the National Institutes of Health. OA is a top cause of disability in older people. The goal of osteoarthritis treatment is to reduce pain and improve function. There is no cure for the disease, but some treatments attempt to slow disease progression.
RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS
RA is the most common form of autoimmune arthritis, affecting more than 1.3 million Americans. Of these, about 75 percent are women. In fact, 1–3 percent of women may get rheumatoid arthritis in their lifetime. The disease most often begins between the fourth and sixth decades of life. However, RA can start at any age. RA is a chronic (long-term) disease that causes pain, stiffness, swelling and limited motion and function of many joints. While RA can affect any joint, the small joints in the hands and feet tend to be involved most often. Inflammation sometimes can affect organs as well, for instance, the eyes or lungs. The stiffness seen in active RA is most often worst in the morning. It may last one to two hours (or even the whole day). Stiffness for a long time in the morning is a clue that you may have RA, since few other arthritic diseases behave this way.
Lupus is a chronic, autoimmune disease that can damage any part of the body (skin, joints, and/or organs inside the body). Chronic means that the signs and symptoms tend to last longer than six weeks and often for many years. In lupus, something goes wrong with your immune system, which is the part of the body that fights off viruses, bacteria, and germs ("foreign invaders," like the flu). Normally our immune system produces proteins called antibodies that protect the body from these invaders. Autoimmune means your immune system cannot tell the difference between these foreign invaders and your body’s healthy tissues ("auto" means "self") and creates autoantibodies that attack and destroy healthy tissue. These autoantibodies cause inflammation, pain, and damage in various parts of the body.
OSTEOPOROSIS
LUPUS